Eating Pasta, Florentine Style.

Florence has its open food market, the Centrale Mercato. Each stall  have their own specialty from nuts to elaborate meats.

Upstairs is where they all culminate in their version of a food court. Here you can eat cheap and good,drink as well.

 

 

 

I was in the mood for pasta so I saw this sign..

 

 

 

 

 

 

The chef whipped it up for me..Prego

 

It was light and excellent….  FYI I found out the translation..” Cow Stomach Ravioli in a Parsley,Basil sauce”.   MOOOOO…

Florence for Lovers

Sunset paints Florence. Along the Arno river  hundreds of people gather to celebrate it for many reasons beyond its visual beauty.

Some need company,

 

 

 

 

some find it.

 

Some, while not sanctioned by the local authorities,

 

 

profess it, lovers locked together, key thrown into the river

 

 

all images ©2017matthewpace

contact matt@matthewpace.com

Pasta,Cheese,Prosciutto,Love..Roman Style

So my journey begins in Rome…not in Pennsylvania…but Italy. Hot and crowded in summer, like really really crowded, it’s rich in monuments, fountains, antiquities and of course, The Vatican. Of course we all know that so put the trip on your bucket list, go in fall.

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For me, it’s also about food since that’s what I do as Miami Food Photography.

 

 

 

 

Salumi, cold cuts to us, and cheese with a great non-alcoholic drink called Grodini, that tastes like Compari and oranges, very refreshing and habit forming. It’s perfect by day but it’s what’s up at night that makes Rome even more interesting.

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Wonderful sidewalk cafes serve their specialties. Look down the smallest side streets and find them. This one had fresh made pasta and gelato.

 

 

 

 

 

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Who knows..eat enough pasta, soak in the night air, bask in the night light and buona fortuna!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Timothy Duque…Chef

From his beginnings at Johnson Wales University,North Miami, he worked his way up as intern at the Westin Diplomat in Hollywood, where we met. He spent ten years there learning everything he could from fine dining to high volume banquet cooking. This broad experience helped to hone his expertise to create the chef he is today.

 

” My grandmother is Colombian and I grew up making empanadas and arepas from scratch with some very old family recipes ”

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Tim gives this advice to newbies…” Stay focused. Many newcomers are distracted by money and fame. If you aren’t passionate about food, the long hours and stressful days will definitely consume you. The most rewarding part of what we do is serving others and conveying our passion through our preparations.”

for some behind the scenes:

Corey Bousquet…The Brick

“..One day I want to open a farm to table style restaurant..” a boyhood dream, and at 28 years old Corey Bousquet did it. It’s called The Brick, located at 8955 SW. 72 PL Kendall, in one of South Miami’s most up and coming neighborhoods, Downtown Dadeland.

Corey Bousquet

His first exposure to the business came from his neighbor who owned an Italian style pizzeria sit down restaurant where he started as a busboy at 14.

The owner’s mother had a two acre farm on Eastern Long Island where she grew and picked fresh vegetables for the menu.

“..there”s something special about working with smaller local farmers.. being able to name where the produce comes from in the salad that one of my guests is eating..”

Working his way up and gathering  experiences from many different types of restaurants, Corey advanced to a manager, learning the business inside and out.

With a great investor behind him who believed in his vision, he proceeded to do his research that would lead to the best location and with a new design for today’s market.

” I spent a year before opening, doing my homework with demographic researches, target markets, advertising strategies…in order to set myself up for success..”_MG_4642-3BW

The next step was calling out to one of Miami’s longtime well known chefs, Chef Allen Susser’s   consultation for a sound operation.

Corey’s advice to newcomers in the business…” Do your homework…it pays to know your stuff..”  “I have put everything on the line to see it succeed, my employees can see and feel my passion , in turn making them passionate about it. ” _MG_4659-9

” At the end of the day, I wouldn’t change what I do for anything..”

Got Crabs?

Who would want that!!! Actually I did and it was the kind of challenge I enjoy doing, and of course eating. My client has a top end product, canned crab meat…all kinds. My job , just the type  I love to do, style,prop,light,create,shoot…

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showing the product , all 19 for page use….

what’s inside  Backfin_Miami Food Photography-3228

How to use…Miami Food Photography-4007-8

Colossal crab,squeeze of lemon,sweet onions,tomato,lettuce,thousand island,on multi-grain bread…mmm… if you eliminate the bread,chop up the rest,you would have a great crab salad as well.       P.S. goes great with a cold Pinot Grigio, maybe two.

 

Sudado de Pollo..( you don’t want to know what this means)

Here’s a Colombian recipe we tried that proves to be a whole lot better than its name translates to, take my word along with a cold glass of white or rose wine and a good loaf of crispy bread. It also gets better the next day…

Recipe:
5 yellow potatoes (peeled and cut in half)      miamifoodphotography_IMG_7875
1 package of frozen yuca
8 pieces of boneless/skinless chicken thighs
1 package of corn on a cob (cut corn in half)
1 red pepper
2 tomatoes
1/4 cup freshly chopped cilantro
2 cups of water
1/2 tsp of ground cumin
1 small sweet onion
1 garlic clove
1 tbsp live oil
Goya sazon with achiote
salt and pepper to taste

Brown the chicken in 1 tbsp of olive oil, salt and pepper to taste.  Set aside when done.
Saute chopped red pepper and onion.  Once the onion is translucent, add the chopped garlic and sauté for another 5 minutes at low heat.
Add 2 cup of water.  When boiling, add yuca, corn, and potatoes.
Add Goya sazon and cumin.
Add browned chicken and cook for another 15 minutes so all the flavors can blend together.

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